Econ 210a: Course Policies
Reading Notes/Discussion Questions for Paul Seabright, "The Company of Strangers"

Econ 210a: Readings and Topics

Spring 2012: U.C. Berkeley:

January 18. The Malthusian Economy (Eichengreen)

  • Thomas Malthus (1798), An Essay on the Principle of Population, Chapters 1-2, pp.1-11, Electronic Scholarly Publishing Project, 1998. http://www.esp.org/books/malthus/population/malthus.pdf

  • E. Anthony Wrigley (1992), “Why Poverty Was Inevitable in Traditional Societies,” in Ernest Gellner, John Hall and I.C. Jarvie (eds.), Transition to Modernity, pp. 71-110. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Gregory Clark (2007), A Farewell to Alms: A Brief Economic History of the World, Chapters 2, “The Logic of the Malthusian Economy,” pp. 19-39 and Chapter 3, “Living Standards,” pp. 40-70. Princeton: Princeton University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services. An earlier draft (not preferred) is available at http://tinyurl.com/dl20090112e (chapter 2) and http://tinyurl.com/dl20090112j (chapter 3).

January 25. The Commercial Revolution (DeLong)

February 1. The Agricultural Revolution (DeLong)

February 8. Slavery, Serfdom and Agriculture (DeLong)

  • Evsey Domar (1970), "The Causes of Slavery or Serfdom: A Hypothesis," Journal of Economic History, pp. 18-32. http://www.jstor.org/stable/i310677

  • Stefano Fenoaltea (1984), “Slavery and Supervision in Comparative Perspective: A Model,” Journal of Economic History 44:3, pp. 635-668. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2124146

  • Ralph Austen and Woodruff Smith (1992), "Private Tooth Decay as Public Economic Virtue: The Slave-Sugar Triangle, Consumerism, and European Industrialization," in Joseph Inkori and Stanley Engerman (eds.), The Atlantic Slave Trade: Effects on Economies, Societies, and Peoples in Africa, the Americas, and Europe , pp. 183-203. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1171366

  • Stanley Engerman and Kenneth Sokoloff (1994), "Factor Endowments, Institutions and Differential Paths of Development among New World Economies: A View from Economic Historians of the United States," NBER Working Paper no. 10066. http://papers.nber.org/papers/h0066.pdf

February 15. The Industrial Revolution (DeLong)

February 22. American Exceptionalism (Eichengreen)

  • Peter Temin (1966), “Labor Scarcity and the Problem of American Industrial Efficiency in the 1850s,” Journal of Economic History 26, pp. 277-298. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2115648

  • Kenneth Sokoloff (1984), “Was the Transition from the Artisanal Shop to the Non-Mechanized Factory Associated with Gains in Efficiency?” Explorations in Economic History 21, pp. 351-382. http://www.nber.org/papers/w1386

  • Robert Fogel (1964), Railroads and American Economic Growth: Essays in Econometric History, Chapters 1 and 6, pp. 1-6 and 207-249. Baltimore MD: Johns Hopkins University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Alfred Chandler (1990), Scale and Scope, Chapter 3, pp. 47-89. Cambridge MA: Harvard University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

February 29. The Uneven Spread of Industrialization (DeLong)

March 7. Capital Markets (Eichengreen)

March 14. Labor Markets (Eichengreen)

  • Sanford Jacoby (1984), “The Development of Internal Labor Markets in American Manufacturing Firms,” in Paul Osterman (ed.), Internal Labor Markets, pp. 23-69. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Susan Carter and Elizabeth Savoca (1990), “Labor Mobility and Lengthy Jobs in 19th Century America,” Journal of Economic History 50, pp. 1-16. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2123435

  • John James (1994), “Job Tenure in the Gilded Age,” in George Grantham and Mary McKinnon (eds.), Labour Market Evolution, pp. 185-204. London: Routledge. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Joshua Rosenbloom (1990), “One Market or Many? Labor Market Integration in the Late-19th Century United States,” Journal of Economic History 50, pp. 87-107. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2123439

  • Joshua Rosenbloom (2002), “Employment Agencies and Labor Exchanges: The Impact of Intermediaries in the Market for Labor,” in Joshua Rosenbloom, Looking for Work, Searching for Workers: American Labor Markets during Industrialization, Chapter 3, pp. 46-79. Cambridge, MA: Cambridge University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

March 21. Globalization and Crisis (DeLong)

  • Richard Baldwin and Philippe Martin (1999), “Two Waves of Globalization: Superficial Similarities, Fundamental Differences,” NBER Working Paper no.6904 (January). http://www.nber.org/papers/w6904

  • Douglas Irwin (1998), “Did Late Nineteen Century U.S. Tariffs Promote Infant Industries? Evidence from the Tinplate Industry,” NBER Working Paper no. 6835 (December). http://www.nber.org/papers/w6835

  • Barry Eichengreen and Michael Bordo (2002), “Crises Now and Then: What Lessons from the Last Era of Financial Globalization?” NBER Working Paper no. 8716 (January). http://www.nber.org/papers/w8716

April 4. International Money and Finance (Eichengreen)

  • Arthur Bloomfield (1959), Monetary Policy under the International Gold Standard, pp. 1-62. New York, Federal Reserve Bank of New York. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Barry Eichengreen (1992), Golden Fetters: The Gold Standard and the Great Depression, 1919-1939, Chapter 2, pp. 29-66. New York: Oxford University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Hugh Rockoff (1984), “Some Evidence on the Real Price of Gold, Its Costs of Production and Commodity Prices,” in Michael Bordo and Anna J. Schwartz (eds.), A Retrospective on the Classical Gold Standard,” pp. 613-650. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. http://ideas.repec.org/h/nbr/nberch/11139.html

  • Albert Fishlow (1985), “Lessons from the Past: Capital Markets During the 19th Century and the Interwar Period,” International Organization 39, pp. 383-439. http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayFulltext?type=1&pdftype=1&fid=4281908&jid=INO&volumeId=39&issueId=03&aid=4281900

  • Juan-Huitzi Flores (2007), “Lending Booms, Underwriting and Competition: The Baring Crisis Revisited,” Working Paper in Economic History 07/01, Department of Economic History and Institutions, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (January). http://docubib.uc3m.es/WORKINGPAPERS/WH/wp07-01.pdf

April 11. Origins of the Great Depression (Eichengreen)

  • Milton Friedman and Anna Schwartz (1963), A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960, Chapter 13, pp. 676-700. Princeton: Princeton University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Christina Romer (1990), "The Great Crash and the Onset of the Great Depression," Quarterly Journal of Economics 104, pp. 719-736. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/2937892

  • Ben Bernanke (1983), "Nonmonetary Effects of the Financial Crisis in the Propagation of the Great Depression," American Economic Review 73:3, pp. 257-276. http://www.jstor.org/stable/1808111

  • Ben Bernanke (1995), “The Macroeconomics of the Great Depression: A Comparative Approach,” Journal of Money, Credit and Banking 27:1, pp. 1-28. http://www.jstor.org/stable/i336266

April 18. Recovery from the Great Depression (Eichengreen, with a possible cameo appearance by C. Romer)

  • Barry Eichengreen (1992), Golden Fetters: The Gold Standard and the Great Depression 1919-1939, Chapter 1, pp. 3-28. New York: Oxford University Press. On reserve at Graduate Services.

  • Christina Romer (1992), “What Ended the Great Depression?” Journal of Economic History 52, pp. 757-784. http://www.jstor.org/stable/2123226

  • Gauti Eggertsson (2008), “Great Expectations and the End of the Great Depression,” American Economic Review 98:4, pp. 1476-1516. http://www.jstor.org/stable/i29730117

  • Harold Cole and Lee Ohanian (2004), “New Deal Policies and the Persistence of the Great Depression: A General Equilibrium Analysis,” Journal of Political Economy 112:4, pp. 779-816. http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/jpe.2004.112.issue-4

April 25. The Great Divergence, the Great Moderation and the Great Recession (DeLong, with a possible cameo appearance by C. Romer)

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