Noted for February 13, 2013
Wednesday Hoisted from the Archives from Four Years Ago: Clive Crook Seems to Have It Slightly Off... Weblogging

From an Economist's Perspective, "Lower Cost" and "Higher Quality" Are Both Simply "Better": It Doesn't Make Sense to Distinguish One from the Other

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Thoreau:

Come on baby, don’t fear the MOOCer: the real threat we face: Massive debt.  If we are done in by MOOCs and whatnot, it will be because the MOOCers tamed costs, not because sitting on your couch with a tablet is better than learning in-person.

Louis Betty:

Don't panic amid predictions of higher ed's demise: Physical presence is key to every aspect of [my students'] learning experience, be it my hovering, breathing presence in the classroom or the office, the cohort of 30 or so warm bodies that shows up for lecture twice a week, or the more abstract form of embodiment conveyed by the weight of a book….

[O]ne of the principal reasons for [the] portended transformation… is that the cost of college is increasingly out of proportion…. The weighing up of costs and benefits involved in earning a college degree will lead inevitably to a re-evaluation of the current higher education model. Luxury residence halls, face-to-face interaction between professors and students, ivied brick walls -- these will all be things of the past once the much-heralded education bubble finally bursts. What will replace them are massively populated, inexpensive online courses and lectures, prerecorded by the very best lecturers and administered by those hordes of professors and other academics not quite sexy or charismatic enough to warrant virtual celebrity….

What Harden forgets -- and indeed, what just about everyone prophesying the eclipse of face-to-face interaction in a virtual world forgets -- is that human beings are, above all else, bodies, and that to lead full, happy, and meaningful lives, we need other bodies…. The benefit of a classroom education is that it keeps students under a certain amount of mental pressure, forces them to think on the spot, and obliges them to explain themselves to other people who are physically present.  Information is afoot in these interactions, but so are wisdom, passion, empathy, and a whole host of other viscera that only an embodied teacher or student can properly convey….

The real culprit, I suggest, is what, for lack of a better term, we might call Appleism. Innocent in principle but nefarious in practice, the doctrine of Appleism holds that increases in technological capability are synonymous with increases in human happiness. Anything that can be put on a screen is better than what can be seen with the naked eye. The passage of electrons through a cathode tube is equivalent to passage from a lower to a higher state of being. Proponents of Appleism hold out technology as an intrinsic good; they are the sorts of folks who compulsively buy the latest Apple product, simply on principle.

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